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The Federalist Papers

The Federalist Papers

❶Having just fought a war against an oppressive British governement I would have thought that they would have been more cautious. Jun 05, Michael rated it it was amazing Shelves:

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View all 5 comments. Aug 31, Greg rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Someone willing to give it the time it merits. First, I'm going to begin with a bitch. The true authorship of these was only known several years after the fact. And took several decades after the authors had been determined to finalize exactly who wrote what.

Furthermore, virtually ever copy includes at least a copy of the Bill of Rights, Declaration o First, I'm going to begin with a bitch. Furthermore, virtually ever copy includes at least a copy of the Bill of Rights, Declaration of Independence, and if you're very lucky The Articles of confederation.

None of the US foundational documents were conceivably written by Alexander Hamilton. However, he did write the vast majority of the Federalist Papers. There are hundreds of printings of this work. The copy I read well over times well, the first 30 of the federalists or so, anyway was a deep red mass market paperback.

I can't remember the publisher. There was a publisher that made all its mass market "classic" paperbacks in deep red for awhile. It had the lovely disintegrating acidic paper, and the binding was just starting to fall apart as I slugged the bottle of champagne and vowed to not read the work again until I was Anyway, this is an incredible book if you're willing to read it well. That means at least one week for one paper.

It benefits very much from close reading. All the hype is true, but reading it poorly makes it sound like pithy bullshit. Follow the terminology in the paper, and put together the relationships between all terms.

The authors were responding to criticisms against the Constitution by the anti-Federalists who also wrote newspaper articles. Some of the concerns of the anti-Federalists were addressed in the Bill of Rights in There is some repetition of ideas in the essays since "The Federalist" was not written as a book originally. The framers of the Constitution came from small and large states, and from urban and rural areas. Some states had many areas of commerce and industry where others were mostly agricultural.

Some states supported slavery, but others wanted to outlaw it. Some of the Founding Fathers wanted a strong central government, but others were more concerned with states rights. The Constitution may not be perfect, but it was quite an accomplishment considering the different interests of the various states and the willingness to compromise. Aug 25, Stephen rated it really liked it Shelves: One of the most important works of American political science and philosophy, this collection of arguments detailing the benefits and advantages of the federal system as envisioned by the founding fathers is a must read to understand the beginnings of the republic.

Nov 27, Jessica marked it as to-read Shelves: I don't know who's a bigger jackass: Actually, that's a lie. I totally do know. View all 3 comments. Jan 13, Stephen rated it it was amazing. This book has completely transformed my views and understanding of our government. The US constitution make so much more sense now that I have read its defense. It's also interesting to read some of the outlandish arguments that were propagated against this ingenious document.

Not much has changed in American politics over the centuries. Our media, pundits, and politicians still banter in much the same way today as they did back in the 's.

I will admit that this book challenged me. The arguments were hard to comprehend at times and I really had to bear down in order to gain some understanding. I also spent roughly one quarter of my reading time looking up words in the dictionary. Makes me regret the time I spent in front of the television or video games instead of sharpening my mind. Keep in mind that the Federalist Papers were originally published as a series of essays in a New York newspaper.

In comparison, I believe that much of today's news has been watered down for a society that has little patience for a real, thorough debate of substantial issues. Jan 19, Kelly rated it it was amazing Shelves: The movie is about President Chavez in Venezuela and the failed coup attempt on his presidency. In the background coverage of his presidency, the filmmakers recounted how as President, he encouraged his citizens to read their brand new constitution and learn it. They interviewed some Venezuelans who did not know to read, but had learned to read by reading their constitution.

And those that have only did it for school and have since forgotten much of what they learned. Personally, I remember having to memorize the Bill of Rights for a class, but that's about it.

And the Federalist Papers are a great way to learn what the founders were thinking when shaping the Constitution and to learn the issues they were concerned about in the structure of our government. It's hard to rate a book like this. On the one hand, it's one of the foundational writings of American history; on the other hand, it's boring.

Much of it is, anyway. I still think it's a book every American should read. I'm just glad I'm finished. I was encouraged by what emerged as the worldview of these authors, as in this excerpt from Federalist 37, written by James Madison, as he r It's hard to rate a book like this. I was encouraged by what emerged as the worldview of these authors, as in this excerpt from Federalist 37, written by James Madison, as he reflected on the forces that brought together the United States: Among the words they used: Oct 17, Christopher rated it liked it Shelves: Don't let the 3 star rating mislead you.

This is a brilliant summation of the Constitution by three of the smartest Founding Fathers: It is such a shame that there are so few political geniuses in government today. The breadth of their knowledge, particularly Madison's, boggles the mind. Except for the fact tha Don't let the 3 star rating mislead you. Except for the fact that they took the view that the Constitution didn't need a bill of rights that was passed after the writing of these papers , you will find no better examination of the Constitution.

But that is one of the problems with "The Federalist Papers," it examines the structure of the federal government in detail brilliantly too , but most of today's Constitutional questions revolve around the amendments to the Constitution. So, if you were looking for the Founding Fathers' ideas about the meaning behind the second amendment, you better find a different book. The other problem with the book is that while the language is not archaic yet , it is still difficult for the average reader to grasp.

If you didn't get a high verbal score on the SATs, look for the version in modern English. So really, this is a great book to read for the serious political scientist, but the average reader should look for something easier or limit themselves to Papers 10 and Oct 15, Miss Clark rated it liked it Recommends it for: Every American and anyone who wants to understand what it was envisioned to be when it began. Boring as all get out, practically put me to sleep and still I ended up liking this book.

How could I not in some ways? It presents the arguments of three men, who if I certainly did not admire, can certainly respect their passionately held opinions and their hopes for what America could be. Also, it really helped me to better understand the Constitution and the Bill of Rights and the historical context that resulted in some of the seemingly odd or unnecessary clauses and stipulations.

And the sh Boring as all get out, practically put me to sleep and still I ended up liking this book. And the sheer history of it! To understand that time and what people were concerned about. To think that hundreds and thousands of Americans read those same papers as they strove to chart the course of America's future and took them into account,as well as the Anti-Federalist papers which I often lean toward. An important, if somewhat somnambulent, read for every American!

Feb 07, Hailey Hudson rated it it was ok. Apr 02, Patrice rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: That I have not read this book before, that most of the people I know, including several lawyers, have never read the entire book, is an educational crime. I think it should be required reading in every high school. It is also very current. The issue of how strong a central government the US should have is still being debated daily. After reading this I think I come down a little on the side of the anti-federalists!

But their worst predictions have come true. The federal governme That I have not read this book before, that most of the people I know, including several lawyers, have never read the entire book, is an educational crime.

The federal government has grown in power beyond what even they imagined. Having just fought a war against an oppressive British governement I would have thought that they would have been more cautious. He seemed to want a government not so far from the British. But Madison was there to counter him, among others. He feels much more "American" to me and what a brilliant mind.

These were great philosophers. They were so well educated and understood all of the great ideas that had come before and created a country based on them. For the first time, a country was "created" based on ideas and principles. And yes, how exceptional America is. In the end I was reassured by the book. With all of the troubles, we have survived. Right now the nation seems to be in the Hamiltonian frame of mind.

No fear of a huge and intrusive federal government. But thanks to the framers, mid term elections are on their way and things will hopefully swing us away from the direction in which things have been going.

Nov 01, Clif Hostetler rated it it was ok Shelves: The Federalist Papers are a series of 85 essays written in and to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution. I found it to be the equivalent of reading a paged legal brief written by an 18th century lawyer. Actually, that's exactly what it is. I found these lectures helpful in describing the debates that took place at the time these papers were written.

I was impressed at the extent and variety of the arguments of "The Federalist Papers" in defending the proposed C The Federalist Papers are a series of 85 essays written in and to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution. I was impressed at the extent and variety of the arguments of "The Federalist Papers" in defending the proposed Constitution.

I guess I can be thankful to live in a country where so much effort and care was put into forming the government. Here's my favorite quotation from The Federalist Papers: Posting them here without editing is easier that trying to write a review: The Federalist Papers specifically Federalist No.

The idea of adding a Bill of Rights to the Constitution was originally controversial because the Constitution, as written, did not specifically enumerate or protect the rights of the people, rather it listed the powers of the government and left all that remained to the states and the people.

Lectures about Federalist and Anti-Federalist debate: Here's a link to information about twelve lectures about the Federalist Papers: I found the following quotation regarding disparity of wealth of particular interest in light of recent statistics showing that the disparity has become greater in recent years: Christopher Nov 12, Is this the case?

If so, what is the relationship of the Thomas text to the "original" Gutenberg text on which it is "based"? If you go to the following link you will find a discussion of the fact that there are "many available versions of the papers.

Thus what the Library of Congress provides is what the scholars at Project Gutenberg have decided to make available. Statistical analysis has been undertaken on several occasions to try to ascertain the authorship question based on word frequencies and writing styles.

Nearly all of the statistical studies show that the disputed papers were written by Madison, although a computer science study theorizes the papers were a collaborative effort. The Federalist Papers were written to support the ratification of the Constitution, specifically in New York.

Whether they succeeded in this mission is questionable. Separate ratification proceedings took place in each state, and the essays were not reliably reprinted outside of New York; furthermore, by the time the series was well underway, a number of important states had already ratified it, for instance Pennsylvania on December New York held out until July 26; certainly The Federalist was more important there than anywhere else, but Furtwangler argues that it "could hardly rival other major forces in the ratification contests"—specifically, these forces included the personal influence of well-known Federalists, for instance Hamilton and Jay, and Anti-Federalists, including Governor George Clinton.

In light of that, Furtwangler observes, "New York's refusal would make that state an odd outsider. Only 19 Federalists were elected to New York's ratification convention, compared to the Anti-Federalists' 46 delegates. While New York did indeed ratify the Constitution on July 26, the lack of public support for pro-Constitution Federalists has led historian John Kaminski to suggest that the impact of The Federalist on New York citizens was "negligible".

As for Virginia, which only ratified the Constitution at its convention on June 25, Hamilton writes in a letter to Madison that the collected edition of The Federalist had been sent to Virginia; Furtwangler presumes that it was to act as a "debater's handbook for the convention there," though he claims that this indirect influence would be a "dubious distinction.

Furtwangler notes that as the series grew, this plan was somewhat changed. The fourth topic expanded into detailed coverage of the individual articles of the Constitution and the institutions it mandated, while the two last topics were merely touched on in the last essay. The papers can be broken down by author as well as by topic. At the start of the series, all three authors were contributing; the first twenty papers are broken down as eleven by Hamilton, five by Madison and four by Jay.

The rest of the series, however, is dominated by three long segments by a single writer: The Federalist Papers specifically Federalist No. The idea of adding a Bill of Rights to the Constitution was originally controversial because the Constitution, as written, did not specifically enumerate or protect the rights of the people, rather it listed the powers of the government and left all that remained to the states and the people.

Alexander Hamilton , the author of Federalist No. However, Hamilton's opposition to a Bill of Rights was far from universal. Robert Yates , writing under the pseudonym Brutus , articulated this view point in the so-called Anti-Federalist No.

References in The Federalist and in the ratification debates warn of demagogues of the variety who through divisive appeals would aim at tyranny. The Federalist begins and ends with this issue. Federal judges, when interpreting the Constitution, frequently use The Federalist Papers as a contemporary account of the intentions of the framers and ratifiers.

Davidowitz to the validity of ex post facto laws in the decision Calder v. Bull , apparently the first decision to mention The Federalist.

The amount of deference that should be given to The Federalist Papers in constitutional interpretation has always been somewhat controversial. Maryland , that "the opinions expressed by the authors of that work have been justly supposed to be entitled to great respect in expounding the Constitution. No tribute can be paid to them which exceeds their merit; but in applying their opinions to the cases which may arise in the progress of our government, a right to judge of their correctness must be retained.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Redirected from Federalist Papers. For the website, see The Federalist website. For other uses, see Federalist disambiguation. Series of 85 essays arguing in favor of the ratification of the US Constitution. Title page of the first collection of The Federalist Retrieved 18 June Retrieved March 16, — via Library of Congress. The Encyclopedia of New York City: Morris, The Forging of the Union: The Authority of Publius: A Reading of the Federalist Papers.

However, Adair concurs with previous historians that these are Madison's writing alone: In honor of the Manuscript Division's centennial, its staff has selected for online display approximately ninety representative documents spanning from the fifteenth century to the mid-twentieth century.

James Madison's Federalist no. Its reasoned statement explains what an expanding nation might do if it accepted the basic premise of majority rule, a balanced government of three separate branches, and a commitment to balance all the diverse interests through a system of checks and balances. Creating the United States. The exhibition includes a section on Creating the United States Constitution that contains images from Thomas Jefferson's copy of the Federalist Papers.

Includes Thomas Jefferson's annotated copy of the Federalist Papers. Printed and sold by J. John Jay, one of the nation's founding fathers, was born on December 12, , to a prominent and wealthy family in the Province of New York. Members of the Constitutional Convention signed the final draft of the Constitution on September 17, Constitution, confirming the fundamental rights of its citizens on December 15, On July 11, , political antagonists and personal enemies Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr met on the heights of Weehawken, New Jersey to settle their longstanding differences with a duel.

The participants fired their pistols in close succession. Burr's shot met its target immediately, fatally wounding Hamilton and leading to his death the following day. Our Documents, Federalist Papers, No.

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The Federalist (later known as The Federalist Papers) is a collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym "Publius" to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution.

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2. In order that the whole subject of these papers may as soon as possible be laid before the public, it is proposed to publish them four times a week--on Tuesday in the New York Packet and on Thursday in the Daily Advertiser. ↑ Back to Top || Federalist No. 8 || The Consequences of Hostilities Between the States From the New York Packet.

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The People Who Mean To Be Their Governors Must Arm Themselves With The Power Which Knowledge Gives. The Federalist Papers. Beginning on October 27, the Federalist Papers were first published in the New York press under the signature of "Publius". These papers are generally considered to be one of the most important contributions to political thought made in America.

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The Federalist Papers [Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay] on tojikon.ml *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Three illustrious early American statesmen defend the political principles and ideologies set forth in the Constitution of the United States/5(K). The Federalist Papers are a series of 85 essays arguing in support of the United States tojikon.mlder Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay were the authors behind the pieces, and the three men wrote collectively under the name of Publius.. Seventy-seven of the essays were published as a series in The Independent Journal, The New .