Skip Nav

How to Write an Expository Essay

Definition: What is an Expository Essay?

❶By building their arguments on hard facts, expository writers can avoid the objections and prejudices that are inherent in other types of writing.

How to Write an Expository Essay

What is an Expository Essay?
How to write an Expository Essay - Outline, Structure, Format, Examples, Topics
But, what is an expository essay?

These topic sentences are all in support of the thesis sentence earlier made. Each topic sentence must be supported by concrete and credible evidences. Take note that you should avoid giving your own opinion in the expository essay as the piece should only contain credible information.

It should strictly be objective. In ending the literary piece, the expository essay outline should have a short summary on the thesis sentence and all the topic sentence that supports it. The summary should be brief, concise and sensible.

Try to summarize the arguments if they exist and the points to support such position. Finally, the expository essay outline should have an ending as catchy as you have established your starting statement.

Some opt to leave it open ended to allow the readers to think more and encourage them to know more about the given topic. The expository essay outline is generally meant to serve as a guideline in order to make the essay you are making organized and easy to understand.

As a writer, you should always write your essay in a manner that it will easily be understood by the readers. In fact, beginning the paragraph with a significant occurrence, study, or discovery earns the writer much credibility because it roots the essay in factual research.

The introduction should end with a strong and thoughtful thesis statement, which declares the main idea that the writer wishes to explain. In short, the body is where the writer convinces the reader of his message. As mentioned above, the body should consist of at least three paragraphs, and each one should cover a separate argument. In other words, make sure you use enough evidence, but if you can add more, your essay will be even stronger.

The concluding paragraph should consist of straightforward and well-organized thoughts that impact the reader. It should answer the questions brought about by the introduction and body sections.

The writer may also provide a punchline to the topic, showing his stance. While an expository essay that follows the universal standard would be five paragraphs long, and around two to three pages, the overall length can vary depending on the requirements of the teacher, editor, writer, or whoever has assigned the essay. In general, these prompts help students to get started writing an expository essay, and they may be inspirational in nature.

They have a more focused purpose, too, requiring students to research and explain a specific topic to meet an educational objective. For instance, a descriptive essay can be assigned to a student to teach him to describe something such as a place, a person, an experience, an object, or a situation.

A cause and effect essay prompt may compel a student to discuss the causes and effects of cheating at school, thus reinforcing the idea that he should avoid cheating. While the overall content of an expository essay will depend largely on the prompt, the student may have some freedom to choose the specific topic, or at least the angle; he wants to illuminate in the paper. For instance, he could explain the origin of a particular group of individuals in society; in such a case, the author should make the story as interesting as possible.

For a process essay, the writer could explain the process of digestion in a cow. A descriptive essay could describe a time when the writer experienced depression, as well as what he believes to be the cause of it. Lastly, the topic for a problem or solution essay could be how society can reduce or eliminate racism, using facts to expose the history of racism in specific communities.

The rubric outlines the requirements for an outstanding essay, a good one, a fair one, or a poor one. An outstanding essay would have an attention-grabbing introduction leading to a clear, defensible thesis; it would proceed with strong evidence in the body and end with a conclusion that explains to the reader why the thesis is correct.

Such an essay would also have near-perfect spelling and grammar throughout. On the other hand, a poor essay might not have an interesting opening, or it may have an unclear thesis, a lack of convincing evidence in the body, a conclusion that does not drive the point home, or a range of grammar and spelling mistakes. Then, explain how it fits into a broader historical scope. If you are writing about a person, name the person and provide a brief biography. Keep in mind that your context should lead up to your thesis statement.

Explain everything your reader needs to know to understand what your topic is about. Then narrow it down until you reach the topic itself. Provide your thesis statement. Your thesis statement should be sentences that express your main argument. If your essay is purely informative, it should address your methods for presenting your information to your readers.

Determine how many paragraphs to include. The most common length for an expository essay is five-paragraphs, but an expository essay can be longer than that. Refer to your assignment guidelines or ask your instructor if you are unsure about the required length of your paper. A five-paragraph essay should include three body paragraphs. Each body paragraph should discuss a piece of supporting evidence that supports your thesis.

Each paragraph should discuss a piece of supporting evidence. Begin each paragraph with a topic sentence. The topic sentence introduces the main idea of the paragraph. It should introduce one piece of supporting evidence that supports your thesis.

If you're working with a specific text, you may start with a direct quote or a properly cited paraphrase of the argument you're referencing. For example, if you are writing an expository essay about the use of dogs in the US Marine Corps during WWII, your main ideas and topic sentences could be something like: Elaborate on your supporting evidence.

After you have stated your topic sentence, provide specific evidence from your research to support it. Offer a new piece of evidence for every body paragraph in your essay. Your evidence could also come from interviews, anecdotes, or personal experience.

Try to provide at least two to three pieces of evidence to support each of your claims. For example, if a paragraph starts with, "War dogs were even eligible to receive military awards for their service," the supporting evidence might be a list of dogs who got awards and the awards they were given. Analyze the significance of each piece of evidence.

Explain how the evidence you have provided in that paragraph connects to your thesis. Write a sentence or two for each piece of evidence. Consider what your readers will need to know as you explain these connections. Conclude and transition into your next paragraph.

Each paragraph should transition into the next. The conclusion of each body paragraph should sum up your main point while showing how it works with your next point. You could write, "Even though Dobermans were the most common breed used in WWII, they were not the only breed, and were not the only dogs recognized for their help. Restate and rephrase your thesis. The first sentence of your concluding paragraph should restate your thesis. But you should not just restate your thesis.

You should also say what the evidence you have provided has added to your thesis. It just says it in a new way while also hinting at the information you included in the body of the essay.

Summarize and review your main ideas. Take one sentence to summarize each main piece of supporting evidence, as presented in your essay's body. You should not introduce any new information in your conclusion.

Revisit your most compelling claims and discuss how they all support your main point. Offer a final thought or call to action. Use your last sentence to make a final statement about your topic. This last part of your final paragraph is your opportunity to say what should happen next.

You can offer a solution or ask a new question about your topic.

School of Creative Writing

Main Topics

Privacy Policy

Expository essay outline As I’ve mentioned above, the successful completion of the paper doesn’t depend on the understanding of the topic only, but your ability to create a functional structure. That’s why it’s always useful to learn how to construct outlines for different types of essay writing.

Privacy FAQs

Read this tutorial of how to write an expository essay outline. I’ve also included a downloadable outline template for your convenience.

About Our Ads

The expository essay outline must also have a thesis sentence. The thesis sentence is the main topic of the essay that fully delivers the purpose of the literary piece. The thesis sentence is the main topic of the essay that fully delivers the purpose of the literary piece. The expository essay is a report or objective presentation of a subject, event, or situation. Given its objective nature, sticking to a sensible expository essay outline is crucial in constructing a clear, complete and easily understandable coalition of facts and views regarding a topic. This type of essay requires you to inform, explain, clarify, or instruct using definitions, facts, examples.

Cookie Info

How to write an Expository essay: outline, format, structure, topics, examples of an Expository essay. Aug 31,  · How to Write an Expository Essay. Expository essays are often assigned in academic settings. In an expository essay, you need to consider an idea, investigate the idea, then explain the idea. Some expository essays may include an argument, 78%().